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Posted by Bruno Real Estate Advisors on 6/3/2018

Attending an open house is a great way to learn a great deal about a home in a relatively short amount of time. It allows you to see inside the home with your own eyes, enabling you to notice details that are omitted in photos, whether itís a noisy neighborhood or a smelly basement.

Aside from learning about the home, an open house is also an opportunity to help real estate agents learn about you. Being prepared and professional at an open house could set you apart from other, more casual, attendees helping you make a good impression.

Since most of us donít attend open houses on the regular, and since there probably isnít an Open House Etiquette 101 course you can take at your local college, it can be difficult to know exactly how to prepare for an open house. How should you dress? Should you take notes? Is it rude to take photos? Which questions are welcome and which should be avoided?

In this article, weíll help demystify the open house, leaving you more prepared to leave a positive impression when you go to see what could potentially be your future home.

Appearance

How should you dress when attending an open house? An open house is neither a funeral nor a trip to the beach. The realtor showing the house likely isnít a fashion critic-theyíre there to answer your questions.

In most cases, casual clothing is appropriate. Since youíll be touring the house and yard, however, you might want to avoid heels.

Questions and conversation

An open house is your time to learn all of the relevant facts about a house. Good questions to ask include upgrades to the house, how many offers it has received, and the current ownerís timeline (when they want or need to close by).

There are other topics youíll want to avoid. Donít ask too many personal questions about the sellers. It will make the real estate agent, understandably, uncomfortable. Also be sure not to reveal too many details about yourself. You donít want to mention things like your spending limit as this will remove some of your powers of negotiation.

Itís okay if the furniture and decorations in the home arenít your taste, but itís a bad idea to criticize these items as you tour the house, as you may offend the agent or owners who have decorated.

Being respectful of the owner'sí space

Even though the house is for sale, itís still someoneís home. Itís inadvisable to bring food or drinks without a secure cap into an open house.

We live in a time when everyone photographs and shares everything. But avoid the temptation to take photos when youíre at an open house. Would you want someone going through your home, taking pictures of your valuables, and then sharing them online? Instead, refer back to photos that are available online or from the agent.

When it comes to touring the house, all of the rooms should be viewable. In fact, if thereís a room you canít enter for any reason this should raise a red flag that something is wrong with the home. However, just because you should look in the closets to get an idea of space doesnít mean you should touch or go through the personal belongings of the homeowner.


Follow all of the above open house tips and youíll be sure to leave a good impression.





Posted by Bruno Real Estate Advisors on 5/27/2018

Buying a vacation home is something that many dream of, but for some itís not just a dream. And itís certainly not something that is only for the rich and the famous. Maybe you have been saving for one your whole life, got a large bonus at work that you want to use as a down payment, or are just going out on a limb; there are several things to consider before taking the plunge and buying a vacation home. Cost: First and foremost, what kind of financial position are you in? Are you able to put down 20% and if not will you be able to afford the potential higher interest rate that goes along with less money done? If you are planning to buy farther away, can you afford the airfare cost for as often as youíd like to spend there? Can you afford the inevitable maintenance that will be necessary? You certainly do not have to be a millionaire to purchase a vacation home, but itís important to know what you can afford and cannot afford. Location: Do you want to buy a vacation home that is within a couple of hours from your home? Or would you rather buy one a plane ride away that may be in a location thatís warm year round? Or do you want to buy a home in another country? This is certainly something that should be determined before beginning your search. Condo vs. Single-Family: Do you want the privacy of a single-family home or do you want the amenities that come along with living in a condo? There is a level of privacy that comes with owning a single-family home versus a condo, as well as there are condo fees to consider. This decision may not matter much to you, but itís important that everyone involved agrees on the type of home they would like to buy. Rent It: Do you plan on renting out your vacation home when you are not there? Are you looking at homes in locations where renting is possible? Can you afford the home if you do not rent it out? If you canít afford the home without renting, how often do you need to rent to be able to afford it? Do you want the hassle of renting it? Itís important to consider this possibility even before you begin your house hunt. Buying a vacation home is extremely exciting, but itís a large investment. It should be well thought out and planned out. But, once you have those details worked outó go out and buy the vacation home of your dreams!





Posted by Bruno Real Estate Advisors on 5/13/2018

If youíre getting ready to buy a home, you know it will be one of the most significant purchases of your entire life. However, are you fully prepared for all of the expenses that buying a home will bring? You donít want to buy a house to find out that you canít afford it after all.


Many expenses go into buying a home that you can plan for ahead of time. Other costs arenít as exact that you will need to add in your budget. Read on to learn more about many of the expenses that throw first-time home buyers for a loop. 


Closing Costs


Closing costs encompass a whole bunch of expenses that youíll incur buying a home. These include:


  • Taxes
  • Application fees
  • Attorney fees
  • Title insurance
  • Reimbursements
  • Recording fees

No matter what the closing costs include, you should plan for these expenses to be about 2-5 percent of the price of your home. Costs can vary widely, but itís good to have a bit of extra cash on hand.


Maintaining Your Home


While most homebuyers are prepared for the initial costs of buying a home, they don't know how much it costs to maintain a home. Each year, things will come up on your property that needs to be addressed continually. These tasks include:


Cleaning

Yard care

Gutters

Pressure washing


These routine tasks are independent of other costs like replacing a stove or fixing a furnace. Homeowners need to be prepared for these expenses as well.


Taxes


Taxes can increase or decrease for any given year. You can lookup taxes in the area where youíre planning to buy a home in order to prepare yourself. You should make sure that your property taxes are comparable with that of other homes in your area.

Utilities


Utilities are what your home runs on. Depending on the climate you live in the number of utilities you pay can vary. Take into account these things:


  • Heat
  • Air conditioning
  • Water
  • Electricity
  • Phone
  • Cable
  • Internet

Most neighborhoods have one or two choices for services, so you can ask people in the neighborhood what providers they [refer and how much their bills are each month.         



Insurance


Youíre required to have homeownerís insurance when you get a mortgage. Even if you donít take out a mortgage and pay cash for a home, itís a wise decision to protect your investment. Estimate how much a yearly policy will cost you ahead of time. 


This insurance will protect your property from things like theft and fire. You can shop around for the best rates based on policies that suit your needs. Itís easy to price out policies online. See where you can save including discounts for security systems or multiple policy discounts. 


If you live in an area where floods or earthquakes are prevalent, you should be aware. Youíll find you need additional policies to cover damage in the event of these disasters. The most important thing about your homeownerís insurance policy is that you check the details for all of the fine print.       





Categories: First Time Buyer   first home  


Posted by Bruno Real Estate Advisors on 4/22/2018

There are a number of steps involved in buying a home. One of the many important things you should do before closing on a new home is to get the house properly inspected.

Buyers sometimes avoid getting a professional inspection for a number of reasons. Some are on a tight budget and want to save a few dollars. Others have time constraints and want to close as soon as possible. And, many buyers believe that omitting an inspection is a way to show trust in the previous owner.

In this article, weíll talk about why getting a home inspection is such an important part before closing on a real estate deal.

Inspection costs

Closing on a home comes with a number of expenses. Application fees, origination fees, underwriting feesÖ the list goes on. If youíre buying a home, you might be tempted to opt out of getting the property inspected to save money.

The cost of an inspection ranges anywhere from $200 for smaller homes, to $400 or more for large homes. However, the cost of not getting your home inspected can be much greater. Even if youíre knowledgeable when it comes to houses, there are a number of things that only the experts can diagnose.

Having a professional inspect the home is the only way to ensure that there arenít any issues that will come back to haunt you (and your wallet) in the months and years to come.

Saving time

Many buyers are eager to close the deal and begin moving into their new home as soon as possible. Sometimes buyers need to vacate their old home before a certain date, others try to time their move around holidays or school vacations.

There are other ways, however, to make sure you get the house inspected in time. First, make sure youíve included a home inspection in your purchase agreement. This will avoid wasted times debating whether or not you are entitled to inspect the home.

Next, call multiple inspectors in your area for quotes and availability. Delaying this step can make you lose time, and inspectors might charge you more if they have to squeeze you into their schedule.

The best time to schedule an inspection is as soon as your offer is accepted.

Maintaining a good relationship with the seller

It may seem like an act of diplomacy to waive a home inspection. In reality, however, nearly all sellers will understand that you are simply doing due diligence to make sure the process runs smoothly for both of you.

Sellers might sometimes offer you the findings of a previous inspection that they had done. In this case, itís still important to have your own inspection done so that you can walk through the home with the inspector and listen to their feedback. You canít be sure of the accuracy of any old reports, and the previous inspector is only accountable to the seller.


Having a home professionally inspected is almost always a good idea. It can save you time and money in repairs that could have been avoided.






Posted by Bruno Real Estate Advisors on 3/25/2018

If youíre looking for a bargain on a home, there are ways that you can tell a seller is ready to give you a great price. 


The Vocabulary Is Right


Sellers who really want to get rid of their property will never say it directly on a listing. Yet, thereís so many different keywords that can help you to distinguish which sellers are in a rush to sell. These words can be found in the listing and include:


  • Motivated seller
  • Priced to sell
  • Needs TLC
  • Bonus offers for closing within a certain timeframe

These keywords and phrases signal that a seller truly is ďmotivated.Ē


Your Agent Gets The Inside Scoop


Sometimes, a sellerís agent will tell a buyerís agent outright that their client is looking to sell in a hurry. This can help you and your agent to work together to make a good offer and get a good deal on the home. 


A Home Has Gone On And Off The Market


If a home has been on and off the market for some time, itís a good bet that youíll be able to get a good deal on the home. If a buyer backs out, it can really put the seller in a bind. If this has happened several times over a period of time, you may have a good shot at getting a good bargain on a home. Your realtor will be able to research the property history and help you find out exactly what happened to the home in the past. This way, youíll know what youíre getting into with the property and if you have a good shot at making a deal.  


Choose The Right Season


At certain times of the year, such as winter where there are fewer listings, sellers are generally more motivated. Thereís less competition along with less buyers. Anyone who is looking during these times may be able to get a better deal on a home they love because of the low supply and demand.  


A Really Good List Price


If the listing price for a home is a real bargain to begin with, you may have a motivated seller on the other side of the listing. A seller who needs to make a quick sale will often put the home on the market at a great price right from the start. This is all in hopes that the home will fly off of the market. 


A low price can also be a bit of a red flag. The seller may have listed the home at a bargain price in hopes of a bidding war between buyers. If you donít want to get into the competition of trying to outbid another buyer, you may want to avoid homes listed at seemingly too-good-to-be-true prices.   


If youíre looking for a hidden bargain on a home, you can see that there are ways that you can find it pretty easily. Happy house hunting!







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